How do you overcome a parent’s resistance to having Live-in care?

Over the years I have often been asked by potential clients – “My parents just wont accept having anyone in the house so how do I overcome that?”

That is a difficult one and not always resolvable…… but the easiest thing is to let us have that conversation with them. Their concerns and worries are perfectly understandable and are often part of a bigger picture.  For most people it is about having to accept that they need help and that they are struggling to cope. The most common concerns are

  • Accepting that they are not coping – I always discuss what daily tasks a person is struggling with, and talk about how a support companion can help them with this, and even help them to improve and cope better over time. This can be as simple as getting dressed in the morning to being able to cook for themselves and keep themselves healthy. Once they understand that it will be a lot easier for them, and in fact that once they regain their confidence and strength they may be able to do it for themselves, they open up to the possibility of receiving help. I often say that it doesn’t have to be for ever, and that once they improve they can reduce the care they receive.
  • Loss of privacy – This is perfectly understandable – not many of us would like someone we don’t know living in our homes unless we really have to.  I always assure them that our support companions are trained to be discreet and unobtrusive – to be there when needed but retreat when not. What is really important here is the matching of our staff to the client – some clients want a chatty bubbly companion and some just want someone who will help them when needed. This is where our skill comes in , and we would always change the companion if there was a clash of styles.

A couple of positives that tend to work are also

  • Children’s guilt! – It is often the children that want the care put in place – especially if they live a long way away. They want to know their parents are safe and cared for, and with our tablet system they can check in from a distance and know exactly what their parents have been doing.
  • Extras – I always say a support companion is there to work, so if personal needs are limited, there are 101 other projects they can get involved in – sorting paperwork, putting old photos in albums, spring cleaning the house. All those things that seem too daunting to even begin.

I know this is a big change but at Eximius we can help the process. Please call me on 07434 901547 to discuss how I can help.

Kate